Dual Harddisk on a Macbook? No Problem!

I’m sorry for the very very very lated upload.

So… there we have it!
In this video I show you guys how to add an extra harddisk into a macbook pro.

Once I lost a directory of my Lightroom library, which I’ve used for 2 years. It’s a loss of 250GB of photos.
Fortunately, I still had the back up file on another clone of that drive. Then I realized how risky it is to connect an external harddisk and work on the fly.
Then I feel that I don’t use the DVD that much, and I rely on external harddisks to store my projects and RAW files.

Tools that you may need include:
1. 2.0 Phillips Screw Driver
2. Relatively small Slot Screw Driver
3. Optical Drive Bay Converter
4. Slim DVD Enclosure or External DVD Drive

It’s been a while since I use this machine with dual drives.
By doing so, one can expand the storage on a laptop up to 2TB.
Mine is 1.2TB right now, and I’m totally satisfied. It works like a charm!

Speed, convenience, and reliability are increased.
Especially, the transfer rate from one to the other is just fantastic.
Even transferring via SATA-II constraint can move 20GB of footages in just a few minutes.

Here is the benchmark score from a previous entry about hard drives speed.

Western Digital Scorpio Blue 5400RPM Buffer 8MB 1TB (SATA-II Constraint @3Gigabit)
Read 106.3MB/s Write 106.2MB/s
*Connected via SATA port, which used to belong to the optical drive

In Summary:
this is an alternative for those who seeks for a solution for limited space on laptop without an external drive.
It’s much faster than USB2.0 and FireWire 800 connection on an external drive. This’s also a solution for laptops those are too old to support the USB3.

Pros:
Transferring Speed
Data Safety

Cons:
Battery consuming
No DVD ready

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OCZ Vertex4 – My Macbook Pro 2009 Upgrade

Things that you may need include:
1. 2.0 Phillips Screw Driver
2. T6 (star-headed) Screw Driver
3. Harddisk Replacement


Here I’d like to add some more in-detailed information about this upgrade.
The Benchmark shows the major improvement in read and write per second.

These are my results from Blackmagic Disk Speed Test.

OCZ Vertex4 256GB (SATA-II Constraint @3Gigabit)Read 212.0MB/s Write 257.8MB/s


Western Digital Scorpio Blue 5400RPM Buffer 8MB 1TB (SATA-II Constraint @3Gigabit)
Read 106.3MB/s Write 106.2MB/s


Seagate Momentus 7200RPM Buffer 16MB 500GB (SATA-II Native @3Gigabit) via FireWire800
Read 65.0MB/s Write 71.4MB/s

I didn’t have the old screenshot for the stock drive (Seagate Momentus) while connected via SATA II inside my machine. If I remember correctly, it was something around Read 85MB/s and Write 95MB/s. Nonetheless, From the test results, I assume that connecting SATA III drives to a SATA II supported mother board gives a better result in performance. Due to the difference in disk spinning speed factor (5400 and 7200 rounds per minutes), this copy of 7200 RPM SATA II drive is still slower than a copy of 5400RPM SATA III drive running at SATA II limit.

Next time, I’ll upload a demonstration VDO about how to replace your Macbook Pro optical drive with the second harddisk, so… Stay tune!